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good not only for beginners but also those who have experience. Almost all of the necessary items to polish Japanese sword are set in this kit, such as several polishing stones and items for finishing work. These are the same quality as the professionals use, so having this kit, you are able to enjoy polishing sword at home as if you are a specialist. It is more reasonable to buy this kit than to buy each item separately, so get this kit and be fully satisfied with your own beautiful sword.

- Contents - Uchigumori-do or Suita-do, Koma-nagura-do, Chu-nagura-do Kaisei-do, Binsui-do, Kongo-do Narume-dai, Yoshino-gami, Nugui, Tsunoko, Ibota, Migaki-bo Ha-zuya"Lacquered", Ji-zuya, Omotesuri"Nagura, Binsui, Omura"

Main Kit last 3 stones first 3 stones

Contents:

Migaki-bo

Migaki-bo (Burnishing Needle Round) High Quality is used at the finishing stage to burnish Shinogi-ji and Mune. Since it is made from superhard steel, it is easier to make an even, mirrorlike finish. The superhard steel will last long.

Yoshino-gami

Japanese traditional paper for lacquering Hazuya and Jizuya. It prevents Hazuya and Jizuya from crumbling during the polishing. Yoshino-gami is also used as a filter for Nugui. 10 sheets inside.

Yoshinogami

Japanese traditional paper for lacquering Hazuya and Jizuya. It prevents Hazuya and Jizuya from crumbling during the polishing. Yoshino-gami is also used as a filter for Nugui. 10 sheets inside.

Tsunoko

Tsunoko, Antler powder, is used to remove oil on the blade before using Migaki-bo or Migaki-bera. Mix Tsunoko with some water , put it on the blade and wipe it with a soft paper or cloth.

Ibota

Lubricating powder derived from insect. Ibota powder prevents friction between Migaki-bo and the blade, so you can use Migaki-bo more smoothly. Before burnishing, wrap Ibota with a coarse cloth and dust the blade with it.

Narume-dai

Stand for Narume work. Place Hazuya and polish the Boshi using the spring of Narume-dai.

Kanahada Nugui

Burnt and powdered iron oxide. Mix it with sword oil and make Nugui. Kanahada is the basic material to make Nugui.

Jizuya

Thinned pieces of Narutaki for finish work. It is used to bring out the Jihada. Make it thin and the surface smooth. Then, polish the Ji neatly. After this work, the blade becomes darker and clearer and the Ji begins to stand out. There are 2 ways to use Jizuya ; lacquered or non-lacquered.

Laquered Hazuya

Thinned pieces of Uchigumori for finish work. It is used to bring out Hamon. Grind it thin and make the surface smooth. Then, polish the Ha neatly. After this work, Hamon appears whitish and cloudy. Hazuya is usually lacquered with Yoshino-gami to make it strong and not to crumble during polishing.

Omotesuri Binsui

Natural polishing stone used for Omote-zuri before Tsushima. Omote-zuri is a work to smooth the surface of the polishing stone. Polishers always use natural stone for this work, because if any particle of artificial stone remains on the polishing stone, it will scratch the blade. Binsui is coarser than Tsushima, so some polishers use it before Tsushima.

Omotesuri Omura

Natural polishing stone used for Omote-zuri. Omote-zuri is a work to smooth the surface of the polishing stone. Polishers always use natural stone for this work, because if any particle of artificial stone remains on the polishing stone, it will scratch the blade. Omura is coarser than Binsui, so it is usually used before Binsui when the surface of the stone is very rough.

Omotesuri Chunagura

Natural polishing stone used for Omote-zuri for Uchigumori-do and Suita-do. Omote-zuri is a work to smooth the surface of the polishing stone. Polishers always use natural stone for this work, because if any particle of artificial stone remains on the Uchigumori or Suita, it will scratch the blade. Tsushima is the finest stone among our 3 Omote-zuri stone and it is almost the same grit as Chu-nagura.

Uchigumori Stone

Natural polishing stone for Japanese sword. It is a final stone of the groundwork. By using Uchigumori-do, Ji and Ha of the sword will appear beautifully . There is no artificial stone substitutive for Uchigumori-do. Top Quality stone

Komanagura Stone

Artificial Koma-nagura stone. 5th stone of the groundwork used before Uchigumori-do. By Koma-nagura, the mark of Chu-nagura must be removed. If the polishing work is not done enough on this stage, and the mark of Chu-nagura is remained, it is difficult to achieve the effect of Uchigumori-do. Asahi Koma-nagura-do can make you work efficiently. At this stage the Hamon has usually become clearly visible.

Chunagura Stone

Natural polishing stone for Japanese sword. 4th stone of the groundwork used before Koma-nagura-do. By Chu-nagura, the mark of Kaisei-do must be removed. Chu-nagura and Koma-nagura is taken from a same mountain but Chu-nagura is coarser.

Kaisei Stone

Natural polishing stone for Japanese sword. 3rd stone of the groundwork used before Chu-nagura-do. By Kaisei-do, the mark of Binsui-do must be removed. The surface of the sword will get smoother and finer.

Binsui Stone

Natural polishing stone for Japanese sword. 2nd stone of the groundwork used before Kaisei-do. By Binsui-do, the mark of Kongo-do or Ara-to must be removed. On this stage it is important to make the shape of the blade, because the blade will not change it 's shape by other finer stones. By the end of Binsui stage the outline of Hamon becomes visible.

Kongo Stone

Natural polishing stone. 1st stone of the groundwork used before Binsui-do. It is coarse and very large. Recently, artificial stone called Kongo-do is mostly used for this stage.

Instructions

1: 1) First, choose polishing stones according to your sword to grind and polish.
#1, Kongo-do >> #2, Binsui-do >> #3, Kaisei-do >> #4, Chunagura-do >> #5, Komanagura-do >> #6, Uchigumori-do
2: Split Hazuya into a small piece (the tip of the little finger size), and make it thinner by grinding it with #3, Kaisei-do and #6, Uchigumori-do. After grinding your sword by #6,Uchigumori-do, polish the part of Ha with Hazuya by the finger (thumb) cushion.
3: Split Jizuya into a small piece (the tip of the little finger size), and make it thinner by grinding it with #3, Kaisei-do and #6, Uchigumori-do. After grinding your sword by #6, Uchigumori-do, polish the part of Ji with Jizuya by the finger (thumb) cushion.
4: Wrap Kanahada up in Yoshinogami paper, then lacquer the filtered liquid from paper to the blade of your sword and polish it with cotton wool etc. Kanahada should be stirred up fully before using.
5: To get Tojiru(liquid), make an oval Hazuya, the same size as 2) and 3), and grind it with #6, Uchigumori-do. Then to make Ha shining and white and to make your Hamon clear, grind the part of Ha with Tojiru by the tip on the thumb. This process is called Hadori.
6: Migaki-bo. This is used to polish Shinogi and Mune. First knead a small quantity of Tsunoko with water, rub it on Shinogi and Mune to remove stains and wipe up the stains. Then polish it with Migaki-bo after making a smooth slide by tapping with Ibota wrapped in a piece of cloth.
7: Place a piece of paper on Narume-dai on which put down a thinly finished rectangular Hazuya to grind Narume(kissaki).
Omotesuri -to make the surface smooth by small piece of stone-
Combinations of polishing stones to make a face to face grinding.
Nagura >> Uchigumori-do
Binsui >> Komanagura-do and Chunagura-do
Omura >> Kaisei-do and Binsui-do